WHERE I BUY MY SUSTAINABLE FISH (Happy Tuna, Queen Victoria Market)

I have always established and maintained a good relationship with all the businesses from whom I buy my produce and have been rewarded – I get very good service and the freshest produce. My fish vendor is a great example.
Happy+tuna+40125_96I consider myself very fortunate.

The seafood is always fresh, the small business is family run, and the sellers show respect for the product. I always know what I am buying because the names of the fish are clearly displayed (From 30 October 2007, The Australian Fish Names Standard – a joint initiative by the seafood industry and the Commonwealth Government – has required vendors and restaurants to use correct, nationally uniform names for all fish). Sometimes their labels also inform the buyer where they have been caught; I also know that I can always ask information about all the fish I purchase.

Whiting2-300x201

At my fish vendor’s, from the counter, I can easily see whole fish being cleaned and cut into saleable portions. As part of the service, when I buy whole fish, I am asked if I would like it filleted on the spot or the few bones removed from the fillets and I know I can request different cuts or ask to vary the size of the portions without feeling embarrassed. I could not wish for better service from all the staff.

The best seafood is fresh, local and what is in season.

My first choice is to select fish, which are not in danger of extinction – sustainable fish.

I do not buy frozen or imported seafood and I am also very fussy about aquaculture.

Naples fish market 4

How fish is caught is crucial to ecological sustainability. The most common methods of commercial fishing are trawling, dredging, netting and trapping – all of which can have considerable impact through the bycatch (other fish and marine life and non-target species). All trawling and dredging damage the seafloor and seabed habitats. Wild fish, line caught (hook and line method) is the preferred, least evasive method of fishing and if I want quality produce, and if I wish to encourage Australian fishers to use more sustainable methods of fishing, I am prepared to pay for it. This may not always mean that I can afford my first choice of fish, however, in spite of my fish vendor being a small business, I can always find a selection of sustainable fish from the better choice category (classification used in the publication, Australia’s Sustainable Seafood Guide, by the Australian Conservation Society – AMCS).

There are specific websites/resources listing sustainable seafood in different countries.

Useful sites about sustainable fish:

 Australia:

Australian Conservation foundation
ACF is working with a number of environment groups to urge Australia’s governments to create a network of marine sanctuaries. You can find out more about these campaigns at Southwest Marine Sanctuaries, Coral Sea Heritage Park and East Coast Marine Sanctuaries.
The Australian Marine Conservation Society
Ocean watch
http://www.oceanwatch.org.au/OceanWatchAustralia-SustainableSeafoodForums.htm
 orate flat fish_0020

Italy:

http://www.moebiusonline.eu/fuorionda/Consumi_ittici.shtml

Canada:

http://www.seachoice.org/profile/result?rating=3

UK:

http://www.greenpeace.org.uk/oceans/what-we-are-doing/sustainable-seafood/sustainable-seafood-frequently-asked-questions

Sardines+crop_0018-200x200

US:
Also:
Friend of the sea
http://www.friendofthesea.org/
Fisheries and Aquaculture Department (different countries)
http://www.fao.org/fishery/countryprofiles/search/en
Marine Stewartship Council
snapper

Sustainable seafood guides (Marine Stewardship Council)

 

 

Of interest
AVAAZ.org

 

MA2SBAE8REVW

 

 

One thought on “WHERE I BUY MY SUSTAINABLE FISH (Happy Tuna, Queen Victoria Market)”

Leave a Reply