Tag Archives: Small Fishy Bites

VONGOLE (COCKLES PIPIS OR CLAMS) WITH SPANISH FLAVOURS

My mother always said that meat and fish should never be mixed. Well, she was wrong and may I say that she had never visited Spain.

The following recipe is nothing new, cooks have played around with it over time using the usual Spanish type ingredients that most of us would have in our pantries.

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Usually when I buy vongole I have them with long pasta (garlic and parsley, a bit of chilli and white wine), but now and again I like to play around with different flavours and because I had some chorizo in the fridge, the vongole ended up being more Spanish than Italian.

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This recipe is in my book second book, Small Fishy Bites .

Paprika is called pimenton in Spain. It has a smoky taste, but if you do not have it use common paprika instead.

 

Because the vongole release their salty juices when cooked, I generally do not add salt.

I have also used prawns and cooked them in the same way. In the past I have also used chunks of prosciutto rather than chorizo.

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If you have bought your prosciutto as a a solid piece and sliced it yourself you will end up with some chunks which are excellent for cooking. I am also able to buy ends (of the bottom part of the leg of prosciutto) from the deli part of the Queen Victoria Market, but any shop that slices prosciutto would have some.

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As an accompaniment, just use bread to mop up the juices. I usually end a meal of this sort with a tasty green leaf salad – and I mean tasty, i.e. a selection of different green leaves with a good vinaigrette.

INGREDIENTS

1k cockles
400-500g cooked cannellini
3 chorizo sausage  (skins removed and  sliced)
2-3 teaspoons smoked pimenton (mixture of sweet and hot to taste)
½ cup extra virgin olive oil
1 glass white wine (or Manzanilla or Fino sherry)
4 spring onions sliced
1-2 cloves garlic chopped finely
2 tablespoons of tomato paste or 1 can (400grams)  of peeled  tomatoes
2 tbsp finely chopped parsley
2 springs of thyme

Rinse the cockles – they are  generally sold clean and unless you have collected them yourself  there should be no need for you to rinse and rinse them until they are clear of sand.
Lightly fry the sliced chorizo in very little oil until it starts to brown. Remove it and set aside and use the same saucepan to proceed with the rest of the ingredients.
Add more oil to the pan and sauté the onions on low heat till they soften; add the garlic and pimenton, stir gently for 1 minute.
Add tomatoes, thyme and wine or sherry, cover and simmer until the sauce has thickened.
Add cockles and parsley.
Cover and cook until they have opened, shaking the saucepan occasionally to distribute the heat evenly.

 

 

INSALATA RUSSA (Party time – Russian salad)

Helping my mother to make Insalata Russa was my job throughout my childhood and teenage years. It was a legacy from Trieste and a reliable antipasto served on special occasions. She kept making it well into the 80s and then it would re-appear intermittently throughout the years. She would present it before we would sit at a table for a meal, as a nibble…  she would pass around a spoonful of Insalata Russa on a slice of bread from a French stick.

Those of you who are of a certain age may remember Rosso Antico (a red aperitif) or a Cinzano (vermouth) or a martini. Sometimes it would be a straight gin with a twist of lemon.  Today you may prefer a different aperitif like Aperol or a glass of Prosecco or a Campari  you get the idea!

It keeps well in the fridge and is an easy accompaniment for drinks – I am thinking of those unexpected guests who may pop in …. a drink, a small plate of Insalata Russa and some good bread. If my mother was still alive she would probably be making it on Christmas eve or Christmas day.

Insalata Russa is made with cooked vegetables: peas, green beans, carrots and potatoes cut into small cubes and smothered with homemade egg mayonnaise. She always decorated the top with slices of hard-boiled eggs and  slices of stuffed green olives. Sometimes she also placed on top small cooked prawns or canned tuna.

***** Modern Times…..Try it sprinkled with Yarra Valley caviar (fish roe) instead.

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Ensaladilla rusa is the Spanish version of this salad and it is a very common tapas dish; It was certainly still popular as a Tapas in Madrid and Barcelona when I was there last year.

The Spaniards make it the same way, but the canned tuna is often mixed in the salad rather than being placed on top. Some versions have olives, roasted red peppers or asparagus spears arranged on top in an attractive design or just plain with boiled eggs around the edge of the bowl.

Making it with my mother, we never weighed our ingredients, but the following combination and ratios should please anyone’s palate.

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This recipe (and the photos of the pages in the book) are from my second book – Small Fishy Bites.

2-3 medium sized potatoes, waxy are best
1 cup of shelled peas
3 carrots
3 hard-boiled eggs
3/4 -1 cup of green beans cut into 1cm pieces
1/2 cup of Italian giardinieria (mixed garden pickles in vinegar) or cetriolini (small pickled gherkins)
1 and 1/2 cups of homemade egg mayonnaise

Cook potatoes and carrots in their skins in separate pans; cool, peel and cut them into small cubes.
Cook the peas and beans separately; drain and cool. 
Hard boil the eggs; peel them and cube 2 of them.
Cut the giardiniera into small pieces (carrots, turnips, cauliflower, gherkins).
Mix all of these ingredients together with a cup of home made egg mayonnaise.
Level out the Russian salad either on a flat plate or in a bowl and leave in the fridge for at least an hour before decorating it by covering it with the remaining mayonnaise.
Have a good old time placing on the top slices of hard-boiled eggs, drained tuna or small cooked prawns and caviar. Bits of giardiniera will also add colour.

Maionese (Mayonnaise)

My mum made maionese with a wooden spoon. I use a food processor or an electric wand to make mayonnaise:

Mix 1 egg with a little salt in the blender food processor, or in a clean jar (if using the wand).
Slowly add 1–1 ½ cups of extra virgin olive oil in a thin, steady stream through the feed tube while the blender or processor is running, Before adding additional oil, ensure that the oil, which has previously been added has been incorporated completely.
Add a tablespoon of fresh lemon juice when the mayonnaise is creamy. If you are not making the traditional Italian version, it is common to add vinegar instead of lemon juice and a teaspoon of Dijon mustard.
As an alternative, the Spaniards like to add a little saffron (pre-softened in a little warm water). Add this once the mayonnaise is made.
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THANKSGIVING AND CHRISTMAS (Log of smoked trout wrapped in smoked salmon and silverbeet)

It is close to Thanksgiving and I have been thinking of my friends Beverly and Mark who are now living once again in the US.  This post was first published on Nov 28, 2012 and I am  updating it.

I never thought that I would go to a Thanksgiving dinner but here I am in Melbourne Australia with my Canadian-American friends, Beverly and Mark, sharing their 2012 Thanksgiving dinner  with me. It was a real treat and my first experience to the feast that my friends provide on this occasion. As you can see, they have a wonderful view. DSC_2752

Our Canadian-born friends have lived in the US for a long time. They are old hands at this celebration, Beverly says she’s been doing it for 37 years and more) made a roasted, stuffed turkey. The stuffing was made with bread and herbs and tasted marvellous having absorbed some of the juices and flavours of the meat while cooking.

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The juices were also used to make an excellent gravy – this was made with broth (from the turkey’s neck and giblets) and mushrooms. As instructed, we made small hollows in the centre of our very creamy mashed potatoes and filled them with this very flavourful gravy.

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We had roasted butternut pumpkin presented with its seeds – these had been dry roasted in salt beforehand. (Beverly called the pumpkin “squash” and says that it is different to the type of squash she uses at home).

How amazing! And Southern Italians, Greek and Turkish people enjoy pumpkin seeds prepared this way. The Italians call the semi di zucca tostati, (toasted pumpkin seeds) passatempi (pass the time – pass-times).

With the turkey and the pumpkin and the potatoes and the gravy with the mushrooms (she must have been cooking all day!) we had green beans, and cranberry sauce. Beverly was a little put out because she was not able to purchase fresh cranberries to make the sauce.

Here's the food

I brought the starters, but I was asked not to bring as many as I had originally planned. Wanting to keep within the culture of what I understood Thanksgiving to be, I was going to use what, from my reading, were some common ingredients: Camembert cheese, cream cheese, walnut or pecans, prawns (shrimps), smoked salmon or trout. I decided to make a smoked salmon and smoked trout terrine; it turned out well. We ate this with our Pumpernickel bread as we drank our Pimms on the balcony.

The left over cream cheese mixture can be thinned with a little cream and with the addition of some chives it can be served as a sauce to accompany the log. The orange coloured sauce is a rouille –  I made it in case we were having prawns. It was a good accompaniment for this dish.

I later wrote a recipe for this log in my second book, Small Fishy Bites (published in Oct 2013) and called it:

Log of smoked trout wrapped in smoked salmon and silverbeet

3–4 large silverbeet leaves (also called chard), cooked, left whole
9 oz/250 g cream cheese, a little cream or mascarpone, enough to make the cream cheese spreadable
1 teaspoon fresh horseradish, finely
grated, or prepared horseradish
juice of 1 lemon
black or pink pepper, coarsely ground
1 tablespoon chives or scallions/spring onions, thinly sliced
1 tablespoon capers
extra virgin olive oil, salt, pepper and
a little lemon juice, for dressing (optional)
a little extra olive oil,
5–6 slices smoked salmon
smoked trout fillet skinned, boned
4 asparagus spears, cooked
 
Rinse the silverbeet and remove the thick white stalks at the bottom of the
green leaves.
Cook the silverbeet leaves carefully. I usually cook them in a little salted
water, drain them and then lay on kitchen paper to absorb further moisture.
Mix the cream cheese with the cream or mascarpone (this makes the mixture
lighter and more spreadable). Using a wooden spoon, add the horseradish,
lemon juice, pepper, chives and capers.
On a piece of plastic wrap, place a single layer of whole cooked silverbeet
leaves. You may not need to use all four leaves but they come in useful in case
you need to patch up holes. I usually drizzle a little extra virgin olive oil, salt,
pepper and a little lemon juice to dress the leaves, but this is optional.
Top with a very thin layer of cream cheese mixture.
Place a layer of smoked salmon on top of the cream cheese.
Repeat with a very thin layer of cream cheese mixture.
Add a thick strip, or shreds, of smoked trout in the centre. Lay some cooked
asparagus spears on either side.
Cover with more cream cheese mixture.
Use the plastic wrap to roll the layers into a neat log. Use the extra leaves of
silverbeet if necessary. Press it firmly together so that the different layers stick.
Leave for at least an hour or overnight in the refrigerator to set.
Slice and serve.
 

Being renowned as a caponata maker, I wanted to also bring one of the seven Sicilian recipes for caponata in my first book (Sicilian Seafood Cooking, published Oct 2011). I selected the Catanese version of caponata (as the people of Catania make ). They use peppers as well as eggplants as their main ingredients.

The caponata on this occasion was better off in Sicily – we certainly did not need it.

And as the grand finale, Marianna, a professional pastry cook of Sicilian heritage presented a Millefoglie, (the French call Mille-Feuille – flaky puff pastry inter-layered with a rich chocolate crema – creamy custard- in the bottom half and Chantilly cream on top).

As you can see from the photo chocolate swirls and strawberries added flavours as well as decoration to this elegant dessert. In spite of the ingredients it was light, not too sweet and perfect for that occasion. If you live in Melbourne, Marianna’s pastry shop is Dolcetti – her sweets can be ordered and are perfect for a festive occasion.)

And it was a fantastic evening and all of what we ate could also be perfect for an Australian Christmas.

 

 

 

CULINARY JEWELS OF SICILY – A Spring event at Waratah Hills Vineyard

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On Saturday, 20 September 2014  I will be at Waratah Hills Vineyard conducting a lunch time masterclass of Sicilian cooking .

Waratah Hills Vineyard is located on the road to the iconic Wilsons Promontory National Park. It is one of the southern most vineyards on the Australian mainland. The cool, maritime climate wine region is acknowledged as one of the best Pinot Noir producing areas in Australia.

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The owners are Judy and Neil Travers. They have a  simple philosophy is to do everything possible to produce grapes of the highest quality. The artisan approach to detail involves hand picking by clones in small batches at just the right intensity of ripeness.

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Waratah Hills Vineyard was planted 17 years ago in the burgundy style of low trellising and close planting.

It is a beautifully sited vineyard with two acres of Chardonnay planted on a north south slope and seven acres of Pinot Noir separated by a band of trees into two distinctly different areas of the property.

In 2012 Judy and Neil Travers we were delighted to receive the Victorian Tourism Minister’s Encouragement Award for New and Emerging Tourism Businesses.

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This is the information on the flyer:

Culinary jewels of Sicily

On Saturday, 20 September Waratah Hills Vineyard is hosting a lunch time masterclass of Sicilian cooking conducted by Marisa Raniolo Wilkins.

Marisa has written two books on Sicilian cooking; Sicilian Seafood Cooking and Small Fishy Bites.

She is a vivacious fusion of cultures and experience. Her food is very much driven by a curiosity of exploring her cultural origins. The recipes and ingredients of Sicily reflect the influences of the Mediterranean from ancient times to the modern day.

Born in Sicily and raised in Trieste before migrating to Australia with her parents, she regularly visits her extended family in Italy and Sicily; each visit adding to her knowledge of first-hand wonderful food experience.

Places are limited for this hands on three-course cooking, eating and drinking experience at $120 per head. Course notes and recipes are provided for you to take home.

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The 20th September is in Spring and the menu will feature Spring produce and recipes.

I hope to see you there.

What could be better than a very pleasant experience in this beautiful  part of the world!

Check out their wines – you will not be disappointed:

Waratah Hills Winery

http://waratahhills.com.au/

Marisa

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TAPAS MET VIS – Small Fishy Bites: CROCHETTE DI PATATE (Potato Croquettes)

My second book Small Fishy Bites is now translated into Dutch (Tapas Met Vis) and this set me thinking about my friend Lily and how the Dutch like potato croquettes.

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The French call them croquettes, Italians know them as crocchette.

When I was in primary school and living in Adelaide I used to have a friend called Lily. She and her family were Dutch and her mother used to call them Kroket.

My mother also cooked crochette di patate (potato croquettes) and sometimes when we came home from school there would be a snack waiting for us if they had been on the menu and were left over from the night before.

Lily’s mum fried her croquettes in vegetable oil whereas my mum fried hers in olive oil so I could always taste a difference.

Sometimes my mum used to put a little ham or a cube of cheese in the centre.

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In Small Fishy Bites, there is a recipe for crocchette di patate and being a book about fish these croquettes have anchovies or smoked eel in them; the fish can be spread throughout the potato mixture or inserted into the centre. Great with drinks!

In the photo above you can see the two potato ricers I use. The one on the right is very old and came from Trieste where I lived as a child.

To stop the potatoes becoming soggy, I boil the potatoes whole and then peel them once they are cool.

24oz/700 g potatoes
2 eggs, lightly beaten
2 cloves garlic, minced
½ cup parsley, finely chopped
4 anchovies, cut into small pieces (or 4 oz/100 g flaked smoked eel)
salt and freshly ground pepper
a little flour or breadcrumbs to coat the crocchette
extra virgin olive oil for frying

 

Instead of the anchovies you could also use 3½ oz/100 g of smoked eel.
Cook the potatoes until soft (boil or use a microwave). Peel when cool enough
to handle and use a ricer or a Mouli grater (a hand-operated cooking tool
designed for grating or pureeing small quantities of food) mouler to mash
them. Let cool completely.
Add the eggs, garlic, parsley and seasoning and the fish last of all.
Shape the mixture into egg shape patties and just before frying roll them in
a little plain flour.
Fry until golden and only turn once.
 
 

VONGOLE (COCKLES PIPIS OR CLAMS) WITH SPANISH FLAVOURS

Usually when I buy vongole I have them with spaghetti (garlic and parsley and white wine), but now and again I like to play around with different flavours and because I had some Chorizo in the fridge, the vongole ended up being more Spanish than Italian.

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You can see the ingredients that went into this dish. Paprika is called pimenton in Spain. It has a smoky taste, but if you do not have it use common paprika instead.

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Because the vongole release their salty juices when cooked, I generally do not add salt.  A recipe very similar  to this one but without the Chorizo is in my second book, Small Fishy Bites.

1k cockles
400-500g cooked Cannellini beans
3 Chorizo sausage (skins removed and sliced)
2-3 tsps smoked pimenton (mixture of sweet and
hot to taste)
½ cup extra virgin olive oil
1 glass white wine (or Manzanilla or Fino sherry)
4 spring onions sliced
1-2 cloves garlic chopped finely
2 tbsp of tomato paste or 1 can (400grams)
of peeled tomatoes
2-3 tbsp finely chopped parsley
2-3 springs of thyme
Lightly fry the sliced Chorizo in very little oil until it starts to brown. Remove it and set aside and use the same saucepan to proceed with the rest of the ingredients.
Add more oil to the pan and sauté the onions on low heat till they soften; add the garlic and pimenton, stir gently for 1 minute.
Add tomatoes, thyme and wine or sherry, cover and simmer until the sauce has thickened.
Add cockles and parsley.
Cover and cook until they have opened, shaking the saucepan occasionally to distribute the heat evenly.
Serve with plenty of bread.
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Cooking with Spanish flavours sent me looking at some of the photos from my last trip to Spain. Fond memories of good old Barcelona and a butcher in Madrid!

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Writing this recipe has brought back many memories of Spain..

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I enjoyed it very much.

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FRITELLE DI ZUCCHINE (ZUCCHINI FRITTERS with smoked fish)

Versions of  vegetable fritters are found all over The Middle East, Greece and in Southern Italy and I have made different versions of these zucchini to take to different friends’ places on different occasions – they have come in very handy lately as starters with drinks over the silly, festive season. They are simple to make, transportable and you can alter the taste by using different herbs, accompaniments or dipping sauces.

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I usually add cheese and have used crumbled feta or grated pecorino or for a milder taste, ricotta. I fry my fritters in extra virgin olive oil or a mixture of butter and extra virgin olive oil but you can also bake them: place small moulds on a baking tray covered with baking paper and oiled at 200C for 10-15 minutes.

I topped these with slices of ocean trout (gravlax, cured with sugar, salt, vodka, lemon zest).

The sauce I chose to accompany the fritters was made with 1 cup sour cream and 1 teaspoon of each: French mustard, white wine vinegar, fresh chopped dill (or crushed dill seeds) and a ¼ tsp of sugar.

If not using a dipping sauce or topping them with smoked fish, I like to accompany them with anchovies (either white anchovies or packed in oil). I drain the anchovies well and then marinate them in extra virgin olive oil, lemon juice, chopped parsley, grated lemon peel, black pepper and chopped spring onion. These can be made days ahead and kept in the fridge; they are good to eat with fresh bread as well.

500 g small- medium zucchini
salt (not too much) and freshly ground black pepper to taste
2 eggs, lightly beaten
extra virgin olive oil for frying
1 spring onion finely chopped
2 tbsp of one herb cut finely: mint, oregano, fennel fronds, parsley, dill, marjoram or coriander
100g of feta or grated pecorino or ricotta (drained if using the tub variety)

4 tablespoons of plain flour with a teaspoon of baking powder

Grate the zucchini, add a little salt and leave to drain in a colander for at least 30 minutes. Squeeze out any residual moisture; the quantity will shrink to about half the original.
Combine everything together. The mixture should resemble a smooth batter.
Heat the oil and slide heaped tablespoons of zucchini batter in the hot oil. Flatten them with a spatula but only cook a few per time – turn them only once and drain on paper.
 smoked salmon
A version of this recipe can be found in my second book, Small Fishy Bites.

INVOLTINI DI PESCE (Rolled fish: Fish fillets rolled around a herb stuffing)

There is a sense of celebration associated with eating fish and this recipe for rolled fish could be a good starter to a meal – great for any of these festive occasions.

Whiting roll ups

It is Christmas eve and I intend making these as a starter tonight. It will be a menu of all fish in keeping with the Italian tradition of abstaining from meat; this is a left over practice from days when Catholics did not eat meat during certain days in Advent, a time of expectant waiting and preparation for the celebration of the Nativity of Jesus.

Xmas baubles

These little morsels are fish fillets rolled around a light stuffing– only herbs, lemon peel and garlic are used. Fillets of small fish (with skin on) are suitable: anything from mild-flavoured whiting, stronger tasting flathead to even stronger oilier fish such as mullet or sardines. They can be pan-fried in a  non stick frypan with  a little butter or extra virgin olive oil and then eaten with a squeeze of fresh lemon juice. You may also wish to deglaze the pan with a little white wine or use orange juice (juice of 2 oranges), these will provide a ready-made sauce. For the orange juice option you could use fresh basil as the herb for the stuffing.

I have made these little rolls many times. Sometimes I have deglazed the pan with Marsala (dry), or white wine. I have also used tarragon as my herb and used vermouth. An alternative stuffing can be made using some breadcrumbs (made from 1 day old, sour dough bread), toast them in a  frypan with a little extra virgin olive oil. To these add a little minced garlic, chopped parsley, grated lemon peel, a sprinkling of sugar and a little nutmeg. Pine nuts and currants can also be added to this stuffing.

Fish fillets rolled around a herb stuffing is one of the recipes is in my book, Small Fishy Bites.

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 INGREDIENTS AND PROCESSES
6 fish fillets from small fish, I used King George whiting
fresh herbs for stuffing (rosemary, parsley, oregano or marjoram)
2 cloves garlic, finely chopped
1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil or butter or a mixture of both
salt and freshly ground pepper
fresh bay leaves
grated peel of 1 orange or lemon
Flatten each fillet; if using large fillets, cut into smaller strips. Sprinkle each with a little salt and pepper.
Chop the herbs finely and leave a small sprig to insert at one end of the fish rolls (for decoration).
Mix the herbs, garlic and peel with 1 tablespoon of olive oil (or soft butter- this is less Sicilian). Place a little of the stuffing at one end of each fillet and roll up. Secure each roll with a toothpick and place a sprig of herbs at one end.
Sauté fish rolls in remaining extra virgin olive oil and /or the butter.
Add a little seasoning and bay leaves and continue to cook the fish until it is ready.
Serve with a squeeze of lemon.
Elena's Magi plate

 

COOKING CLASS, SMALL FISHY BITES, MERCATO

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Small Fishy Bites

Cooking Class with Marisa Raniolo Wilkins

Friday 22nd November 2013

Mercato 625-627 Lower North East Road, Campbelltown SA 5074  | ph. 08 8337 1808  | fax. 08 8337 8024  | 

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The Menu and Wine list

Starter

Spuntino platter (a selection of smallgoods)

Tomato and Gorgonzola salad

We Drank:

Martinez Marsala Superiore Secco

Variety – Pinot Bianco

Recognised as one of the master producers of Pinot Bianco, this single vineyard ‘entry level’ comes from vines of an average age of 25 years. The soil (100% calcaric) and the elevation (600m above sea level) lend themselves towards this most impressive, full flavoured Pinot Bianco Marsala of finesse.


Jay & Alana dress scallops close up

Entrée

Scallops wrapped in prosciutto

White anchovy and oven-dried tomato leaf boats

Fish balls in a tomato salsa (pine nuts and sun-dried grapes)

 

We Drank:

Tenuta di Fessina “Nakone” Chardonnay

Variety – Chardonnay

From a vineyard 700m above sea level, Nakone Chardonnay is a reflection of its site as well as the variety. It doesn’t have the richness of typical Sicilian Chardonnay, & carries a racy structure typical of a wine from vineyards grown high up on lean soil. Yellow green, with persistent fresh fruit, its palate is bright, briney & fresh in its youth, which ages well over some years.

$46.95

 

Harry pours wine

Main course

Fish fillets rolled around a herb stuffing cooked in dry marsala

Italian grilled prawns with a fried breadcrumb and herb garnish (garlic, pine nuts, parsley)

Green leaf salad with fennel and oranges

Marisa and diners

We Drank:

Tenuta di Fessina “Ero” Nero d’Avola 

Variety – Nero d’Avola

Ero Nero d’Avola is Fessina entry level red, and the 3 most non-nonsense wine they make. Fermented in stainless and then taken out immediately after fermentation, its bottle aged for only three months before being sold. This is true, chubby, plumy Sicilian red wine, morello cherry, blackberry and spice, with a fresh and juicy palate with great acidity and length.

$44.95

 

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Dessert

Zuppa Inglese made with Strega (rather than Alchermes liqueur)

We Drank:

Martinez Malvasia “Laus”

Grape: Malvasia

Region: Sicilia

What a fascinating & intense wine this is, with its note of spirit, orange, raisin/muscat fruit and nutmeg spicy finish. A beautifully shaped fortified/sweetie, which slowly dries right through to tingling finish.

$18.95

Zuppa Inglese close up 

 

SMALL FISHY BITES CELEBRATION EVENT AT THE MOAT, AND MEDIA

My second book, Small Fishy Bites, was released by New Holland on 1 October 2013.

To mark the occasion, on the evening before, friends joined me for a celebratory dinner at the Moat Bar and Cafe in Little Lonsdale Street below the Wheeler Centre.

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The Moat was the perfect place to launch the book, enjoy excellent food and wine – a brilliant match for the occasion.

Thanks to all my friends who enjoy eating and cooking fish and whose contributions have enlarged my repertoire of recipes.

Below, photo shoot in my apartment.

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Food photography by Sue Stubbs, styling by Jodi Wuesterwald.

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Getting a chance to look in….most unusual as I spent the majority of time cooking.

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Printed media

From: The Australian  Michelle Rowe: Food Detective, October 05, 2013 12:00AM

I took the following comment by Michelle Rowe to be a positive rather than a negative and I appreciated being mentioned in her weekly column.

She praises Sicilian Seafood Cooking and for this I am pleased. And there is a hint that in spite of its title, Small Fishy Bites could be OK.

DETECTIVE accepts that with so many cookbooks out these days, it may be difficult to think up a title that has not already been claimed, but she wonders whether anybody could have fixed upon a less-inviting moniker than Small Fishy Bites? She trusts the new book from Marisa Raniolo Wilkins, who also wrote the very good Sicilian Seafood Cooking, holds more promise than its distinctly fishy title.

Equiem, online portal, Melbourne cookbook author gives Friday night fish ‘n chips the boot, Bronwyn Eager, October 2013

Oh Yum Magazine, New Zealand

The Victorian Writer, Food and Wine, Voices: Bring to the boil, Simmer slowly, Marisa Raniolo Wilkins, November 2013

Yorke Peninsula, Country Times ,  Yorke Peninsula Seafood in Cookbook, Wendy Burman, 22 October 2013

EVENTS

Cooking Class at Mercato, Adelaide, 22 November,